Streets

Q. I’ve noticed that City of Antioch streetlights are being changed… what’s going on?
 

The City of Antioch Lighting Retrofit Project began with the installation of energy efficient fluorescent lights in seven City buildings and has proceeded to the replacement of all 8,725 HPS (high pressure sodium) street & park lights in the City of Antioch with energy-efficient induction lamps and generators.

The project is reported to be the largest of its kind in the U.S. and is scheduled for completion this year (2010).

A press describing the project can be found at http://www.greenerbuildings.com/news/2010/02/18/honeywell-oversees-46m-lighting-retrofit-california-town.

Q. How much is the project going to cost and what is the benefit to the City?
Q. Who is doing the work?
Q. How did the project develop?
Q. What was the reaction to the pilot project?
Q. What are the benefits of the induction lighting retrofits?
Q. The new lights seem kind of blue. Why is that?
Q. Sometimes it seems like the new lights are brighter than the old ones, and sometimes it seems like they are dimmer. Why is that?
Q. Why can’t I see the new lights as I drive down the street? Why does this also makes them seem not as bright?
Q. Why does the new light seem to shine into my window more than before?
Q. Why does it seem like there are more dark spots between the poles than before?
Q. The installers changed the light in front of my house, and now it’s out. Who should I contact?
Q. I still have more questions. Who do I contact?
Q. I’ve noticed that City of Antioch streetlights are being changed… what’s going on?
Q. How much is the project going to cost and what is the benefit to the City?
Q. Who is doing the work?
Q. How did the project develop?
  The project received approval in 2009 in two phases; first as a pilot project, and then as a full-scale construction model.
The Phase One pilot project, approved at public hearing by the City Council on March 24, 2009, provided the public, Police & City staff with an opportunity to inspect & evaluate the proposed lighting retrofits. It replaced 24 HPS (high pressure sodium) lamps-- 12 streetlights on Laurel Road, 6 Knoll Park lights and 6 parking lot lights at City Hall-- with energy-efficient induction lamps & generators. The Phase Two installation/retrofit project was approved by the City Council at public hearing on September 22, 2009 and involves the work described above.
Q. What was the reaction to the pilot project?
Q. What are the benefits of the induction lighting retrofits?
Q. The new lights seem kind of blue. Why is that?
Q. Sometimes it seems like the new lights are brighter than the old ones, and sometimes it seems like they are dimmer. Why is that?
Q. Why can’t I see the new lights as I drive down the street? Why does this also makes them seem not as bright?
Q. Why does the new light seem to shine into my window more than before?
Q. Why does it seem like there are more dark spots between the poles than before?
Q. The installers changed the light in front of my house, and now it’s out. Who should I contact?
Q. I still have more questions. Who do I contact?
Q. I’ve noticed that City of Antioch streetlights are being changed… what’s going on?
Q. How much is the project going to cost and what is the benefit to the City?
Q. Who is doing the work?
Q. How did the project develop?
Q. What was the reaction to the pilot project?
  The Antioch Police Department inspected the 24-lamp pilot project and concluded that installation of the new induction street and park lamps would enhance public and officer safety, provide easier identification of cars and people, improve visibility and clarity of images allowing objects to be seen in their normal color, and provide brighter lighting directly beneath the retrofitted lamps.
Light meter readings performed by the Contractor and confirmed by the City’s Engineering Department demonstrated by comparison that the new induction lamps produced photopic (color-blind) light readings which were equivalent to or better than the old HPS lamps, and scotopic (color sensitive) light readings which were much better than the old HPS lamps.
Q. What are the benefits of the induction lighting retrofits?
Q. The new lights seem kind of blue. Why is that?
Q. Sometimes it seems like the new lights are brighter than the old ones, and sometimes it seems like they are dimmer. Why is that?
Q. Why can’t I see the new lights as I drive down the street? Why does this also makes them seem not as bright?
Q. Why does the new light seem to shine into my window more than before?
Q. Why does it seem like there are more dark spots between the poles than before?
Q. The installers changed the light in front of my house, and now it’s out. Who should I contact?
Q. I still have more questions. Who do I contact?
Q. I’ve noticed that City of Antioch streetlights are being changed… what’s going on?
Q. How much is the project going to cost and what is the benefit to the City?
Q. Who is doing the work?
Q. How did the project develop?
Q. What was the reaction to the pilot project?
Q. What are the benefits of the induction lighting retrofits?
  The calculated energy cost savings to the City per year is estimated at $531,339. The energy-efficient induction lamps are expected to last 100,000 hours (approximately 22 years) before needing replacement, a time-period significantly longer that the old HPS lamps whose life expectancy was 3-5 years.
Induction lights illuminate instantly and provide uniformity & consistency of lighting. In addition, the replacement lamps are estimated to reduce CO2 carbon emissions by 1,825 tons per year, equivalent to planting 700 acres of trees or removing 300 cars from the road.
Q. The new lights seem kind of blue. Why is that?
Q. Sometimes it seems like the new lights are brighter than the old ones, and sometimes it seems like they are dimmer. Why is that?
Q. Why can’t I see the new lights as I drive down the street? Why does this also makes them seem not as bright?
Q. Why does the new light seem to shine into my window more than before?
Q. Why does it seem like there are more dark spots between the poles than before?
Q. The installers changed the light in front of my house, and now it’s out. Who should I contact?
Q. I still have more questions. Who do I contact?
Q. I’ve noticed that City of Antioch streetlights are being changed… what’s going on?
Q. How much is the project going to cost and what is the benefit to the City?
Q. Who is doing the work?
Q. How did the project develop?
Q. What was the reaction to the pilot project?
Q. What are the benefits of the induction lighting retrofits?
Q. The new lights seem kind of blue. Why is that?
Q. Sometimes it seems like the new lights are brighter than the old ones, and sometimes it seems like they are dimmer. Why is that?
Q. Why can’t I see the new lights as I drive down the street? Why does this also makes them seem not as bright?
  In addition to replacing the light source inside the fixture, the lighting upgrade project is replacing the lenses on the streetlights. The old lenses drop down below the light fixture and shoot the light out to the sides. This creates the glare that you see as you drive down the street. This isn’t usable light, and also contributes to light pollution by directing light up into the sky. The new lenses are flat and clear. More light comes out of the fixture to be used where it is needed, but from a distance you can’t see the light fixture. The lens was designed like this on purpose. Both the City and Honeywell have verified with light meters that the light levels after the retrofit are the same or better than the light levels before.
Q. Why does the new light seem to shine into my window more than before?
Q. Why does it seem like there are more dark spots between the poles than before?
Q. The installers changed the light in front of my house, and now it’s out. Who should I contact?
Q. I still have more questions. Who do I contact?
Q. I’ve noticed that City of Antioch streetlights are being changed… what’s going on?
Q. How much is the project going to cost and what is the benefit to the City?
Q. Who is doing the work?
Q. How did the project develop?
Q. What was the reaction to the pilot project?
Q. What are the benefits of the induction lighting retrofits?
Q. The new lights seem kind of blue. Why is that?
Q. Sometimes it seems like the new lights are brighter than the old ones, and sometimes it seems like they are dimmer. Why is that?
Q. Why can’t I see the new lights as I drive down the street? Why does this also makes them seem not as bright?
Q. Why does the new light seem to shine into my window more than before?
Q. Why does it seem like there are more dark spots between the poles than before?
  Part of the perception of dark spots between poles is because the lights are new, and that causes you to look closely at something that you probably never noticed before. There were darker spots between poles before. Again, both the City and Honeywell have done measurements to ensure that there is at least as much light between the poles as there was before.
Part of the perception also goes back to a previous answer. The yellow light is easier to discern on objects, so it’s easy to tell exactly how far it travels. The white light just lights up the object, so it isn’t as easy to tell where the light is coming from.
An easy test that you can do is to walk down the street away from the light and notice how long you can see your shadow. The shadow lets you know that light from the street light is reaching you.
Q. The installers changed the light in front of my house, and now it’s out. Who should I contact?
Q. I still have more questions. Who do I contact?

Public Works Department

  • Ron Bernal
  • Public Works Director
    /City Engineer

Streets

  • Mike Bechtholdt
  • Deputy Public Works Director
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